Erosion Control

Why use TrapBag® for Erosion Control?

Worldwide our beautiful beaches are under heavy attack from higher sea levels and more severe weather conditions as a result of the continuous process of global warming. By installing a TrapBag® barrier system inside the beach, the beach erosion will be slowed down drastically to reduce the frequency, volume and cost for sand renourishment.  

Erosion occurs when any force (terrestrial, aquatic, or human) leads to the destruction of soil, cliffs, coasts or other natural landscape features.

TrapBag® products can be a solution for many types of erosion. TrapBag® is a low cost, rapid deploy erosion control barrier bag similar to, yet superior than, conventional sandbags.

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eroded coastal bluff

Types of Erosion

Soil Erosion

Soil erosion is a natural process, however, like other types of erosion, it is exacerbated by human activities. 

“Although soil erosion is a natural process, human activities over the past decades have greatly accelerated it. In fact, according to UNESCO, land degradation is undermining the well-being of two-fifths of humanity, driving species extinct and intensifying climate change. According to a senior UN official, all of the world’s topsoil could be gone within 60 years.” — 

Soil Erosion: Definition, Causes And Consequences, youmatter.world

Soil erosion is the process of topsoil movement caused by wind, water, and other forces which lead to deterioration.

There are five basic types of soil erosion:

  1. Wind erosion
  2. Sheet erosion by water
  3. Rill erosion
  4. Gully erosion
  5. Ephemeral erosion

(https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/soil-erosion-agricultural-production-challenge)

Soil erosion is caused by human activities including deforestation for agriculture, overgrazing, agrochemical use, construction and recreation.

Coastal Erosion & Cliff Erosion

Worldwide our beautiful beaches are under heavy attack from higher sea levels and more severe weather conditions as a result of the continuous process of global warming. By installing a TrapBag® barrier system inside the beach, the beach erosion will be slowed down drastically to reduce the frequency, volume and cost for sand renourishment.  

“Water is an extremely powerful source of erosion, and — depending on where you live — can come in many different forms. In Michigan, erosion can happen because of waves, storms, and changing water levels. Here are some of the aquatic forces that lead to erosion:

  1. Splash: Precipitation and storm water hitting loose soil cause heavy displacement depending on the slope of the property.
  2. Waves: Waves caused by boats or natural causes can displace loose soil when the soil composition isn’t right for the area and natural vegetation has been removed.
  3. Ice: When lakes freeze and then melt, sheets of ice are pushed up onto the shore. This is occurring more and more frequently as water levels rise.
  4. Storm Water: As storm water moves over loose soil, layers of the soil are removed/displaced in ‘sheets’ leading to something called ‘Sheet Erosion.’” (Shoreline Erosion: A Complete Guide, SuperiorGroundcover.com).

Coastal or shoreline erosion includes erosion of sand dunes. (link to sand dune page) 

Cliff erosion happens through two processes. The first, notching, is when continuous wave action carves out “notches” at the base of a cliff. The second is collapse caused by a combination of erosive forces.

How are TrapBags® used for erosion control?

TrapBags® are great for erosion control because they take on wave action and secure the land behind it preventing further erosion. The TrapBags® come with attachable lids that prevent the fill material from escaping during wave action.

Worldwide our beautiful beaches are under heavy attack from higher sea levels and more severe weather conditions as a result of the continuous process of global warming. By installing a TrapBag® barrier system inside the beach, the beach erosion will be slowed down drastically to reduce the frequency, volume and cost for sand renourishment.  

TrapBag® is a series of pentagon-shaped bags that are sloped on one side, vertical on the opposite side and open at the top for filling. Each of the cells are connected side by side like an accordion, each cell has a common wall with the next cell, and are collapsed during storage and deployment. The cells are made of high-strength textile. Each of the cells are self-contained yet rely on the next cell for added strength. If one of the cells is compromised, it will not affect the rest of the barrier, which will remain standing strong. 

What are some techniques used for soil erosion control?

There are many techniques to help control soil erosion. These techniques like revegetation are very effective in many situations. Often, more than one erosion control method is required. 

How do you control erosion on a slope?

Gravity Walls & MSE Walls — Downhill movements of soil, rocks, mud, and other debris can either go slow or fast; it is an ongoing process due to heavy rain, snowfall and high temperature fluctuations in the mountains. Poor construction and maintenance on roads are contributing factors in damage to property and loss of life when falling debris lands on vehicles. TrapBag® barrier bags can be stacked to help reduce or even stop falling debris from causing destruction on roads; all for a relatively low cost and short installation period.

Mudslide Redirection — Mudslides are a serious problem for people living in areas with large hills and mountains and have caused billions of dollars in damages and taken thousands of lives across the world. A mudslide, or debris flow, is a type of fast moving landslide that usually starts on a steep hillside as a shallow landslide that liquefies and accelerates to speeds that are typically around 10 miles per hour, but can exceed 35 miles per hour. A well positioned TrapBag® barrier system will redirect these mountain floods and mudslides to avoid unnecessary damage to property and residents that would otherwise be in danger. 

Read about how Alpine Autism Center used TrapBag® barriers for protection from debris flows here: https://gazette.com/news/limited-colorado-springs-storm-damage-shows-success-of-flood-mitigation/article_bcf2ff80-757c-50c3-9be3-98b45925aa16.html

How do you solve coastal erosion?

Coastal erosion can be prevented by installing TrapBags® to take on the wave action instead of the coast. With TrapBags® in place the waves will no longer hit the sand and erode it over time.

After a TrapBag® barrier system was installed, Storm Water Solutions awarded Sarasota County for having one of the Top Projects of 2018.  “‘Six months later and after surviving impacts from Hurricane Michael, the TrapBag® shoreline protection system is in great condition,’ Anderson said. ‘Sand has accumulated to completely cover the bottom row of barriers and the public’s infrastructure appears well protected until such time that a permanent solution can be constructed.’” https://www.estormwater.com/shoreline-stabilization-weathers-hurricane-michael?fbclid=IwAR37CkF-L6WH6g3qChzqb41Vlw1xPC2Wl-xCOeUd3u4WfPFkfjUcXc6evyw%C2%A0

What causes erosion?

The main causes for shoreline erosion are natural terrestrial, natural aquatin, and human influences.

Natural Shoreline Erosion Causes

Natural causes of shoreline erosion include splash, waves, ice, storm water, wind, frost action, soil creep, and slumping.

Human Shoreline Erosion Causes

Human causes of shoreline erosion include elevation change, vegetation removal, and driveway/structure installation.

The Michigan Shoreline Partnership states, the “two most destructive actions” that lead to shoreline erosion are removing natural vegetation and building seawalls or “hardening of the shoreline” in any way (Michigan Natural Shoreline Partnership, 2019).

Shoreline hardening causes more issues than it solves in the long term. 

“Seawalls also prevent the absorption of wave energy. When a wave hits a wall — rather than vegetation or soil — the energy is not absorbed, and therefore, is directed elsewhere. Usually, it goes downward toward the lake bottom, where it “scoops” out the soil there. This event is called “scour.” Scouring leads to more habitat loss AND makes the lake deeper until the seawall is no longer viable and the water undercuts it. Scouring also makes the water cloudy, algae-filled, and all together much less pleasant for lake life and people.

Not only do seawalls mess with the lake, but they also mess with neighbors. A phenomena called “wave flanking” happens when a wave hits a seawall and is directed sideways instead of downwards. The wave redirects toward neighboring property which causes erosion damage to those beaches. You can see how this causes somewhat of a domino effect. When one seawall is installed, neighboring seawalls are required to handle the wave flanking, and a vicious and unnatural cycle continues to wreak havoc on the lakes (Shoreline Erosion: A Complete Guide, SuperiorGroundcover.com).”

TrapBags® conversely offer a less disruptive solution. 

Other coastal erosion prevention applications, such as stone breakwaters and seawalls, are more disruptive to the existing shoreline and the organisms that inhabit it. TrapBags® give mother nature a chance to regrow vegetation and regenerate a living shoreline complex. Installing TrapBags® are also much less expensive than installing a seawall or sheet piling.

TrapBags® for erosion control on slopes

Mudslides, also known as debris flows, are a serious problem for people living in areas with large hills and mountains and have caused billions of dollars in damages and taken thousands of lives across the world. A mudslide, or debris flow, is a type of fast moving landslide that usually starts on a steep hillside as a shallow landslide that liquefies and accelerates to speeds that are typically around 10 miles per hour, but can exceed 35 miles per hour. Mudslides are very common after wildfires due to slopes losing their natural stability. A well positioned TrapBag® barrier system will redirect these mountain floods and mudslides to avoid unnecessary damage to property and residents that would otherwise be in danger. 

Downhill movements of soil, rocks, mud, and other debris can either go slow or fast; it is an ongoing process due to heavy rain, snowfall and high temperature fluctuations in the mountains. Poor construction and maintenance on roads are contributing factors in damage to property and loss of life when falling debris lands on vehicles. TrapBag® barrier bags can be stacked to help reduce or even stop falling debris from causing destruction on roads; all for a relatively low cost and short installation period.

TrapBags® for erosion control on shorelines and coasts

Riverbank Stabilization — A major key to protecting your river property is to maintain, stabilize, and repair your riverbank. This river edge is the bulwark that stands in the soil and prevents your property from washing away. It is an essential part of the whole river ecosystem. The TrapBag® barrier system can be applied to stabilize the riverbank for temporary, semi-permanent or even permanent purposes when filled with concrete.

TrapBags® help with riverbank stabilization the same way they help with erosion control. Installing TrapBags® will help secure your riverbank and take on the water that is causing the riverbank to slip.

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but you can always be prepared.

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